Installing Peak-A-Boo / i/thee | ArchDaily

Installing Peak-A-Boo / i/thee

Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Interior photography, Beam, ForestInstallation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Outdoor photography, ForestInstallation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Outdoor photography, ForestInstallation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Interior Photography+ 36


  • Area Area of ​​this architecture project Area :
    2140 ft²

  • Year Year of realization of this architectural project

    Year:


    2022


  • Photographs

  • Manufacturers Marks with products used in this architecture project

    Manufacturers: BEHR Premium, 3D Grasshopper, Footprint, McNeel, Titebond, Trimble, Wyde Wood

Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Outdoor photography, Forest
© Breyden Anderson

Text description provided by the architects. Peeking among the trees on the historic grounds of the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair, Peak-A-Boo takes the form of a continuous series of laminated wood arches and bridges that form a pavilion and a flexible performance space.

Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Interior photography, Forest
© Breyden Anderson
Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Outdoor photography, Forest
© Breyden Anderson

The installation is the first programmable infrastructure in the woods of Bindy Bazaar since the 1969 Woodstock Festival and marks the start of the second phase of a three-year pilot program to develop an art and architecture festival on the site. Organized by Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, the project aimed to re-engage the historic site with design-build pedagogies and was fabricated/installed by students from Texas Tech University as part of the summer course, Architecture IRL , directed by Neal Lucas Hitch and me /te.

Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Outdoor photography, Forest
© Breyden Anderson
Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Outdoor photography, Forest
© Breyden Anderson
Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Outdoor photography, Forest
© Breyden Anderson

The design process began offsite at Texas Tech University, where students hand-modeled various wood laminate design solutions “quilted” with materials to scale. These models were then translated into computer scripts that allowed rapid prototyping and analysis. The final design consists of over sixty quarter-inch sheets of plywood, elastically deformed and laminated together to form a pixelated, bending-active structure. This “wave” of bent plates is then complemented by six digitally constructed glulam arches to mimic the natural flex of the wood cladding.

Peak-A-Boo / i/thee Installation - Image 31 of 36
Model
Peak-A-Boo / i/thee Installation - Image 29 of 36
Model

The structure, in its entirety, was made by students on site at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts in the historic Bindy Bazaar – a craft bazaar and market used as the main entrance sequence for the 1969 Woodstock Festival which has been undergoing restoration since 2017. Construction began with the hand cutting of over 180 unique pieces, which were glued together to form the ribbed substructure.

Peak-A-Boo / i/thee Installation - Image 27 of 36
Floor plan
Peak-A-Boo / i/thee Installation - Image 33 of 36
Section

Sheets of plywood were then attached along the laminated arched members with screws and fastened together with rivets. Conceptually, the project aims to bridge the complex binaries between analog and digital production modes; the structure was designed using computer numerical tools and analysis, but was constructed primarily using in situ hand tools.

Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Interior photography, Forest
© Breyden Anderson

The result is a slender structure, light as a feather but stiff as a board, cascading through the tree canopy like a wooden waterfall or a magic carpet. Although it was built in two weeks, the structure is integrated into the landscape – shrouded and perforated by forest flora – as if it had been there since 1969, waiting to be rediscovered.

Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Outdoor photography, Forest
© Breyden Anderson

Ultimately, the rationale for the structure lies in its ability to shape diverse and comfortable experiences: its arches creating the bandshells under which performers perform; her decks becoming tiered seats for members of the public; the pixelated surface providing an undulating canvas for dancing shadows seeping through the forest glade.

Installation Peak-A-Boo / i/thee - Outdoor photography, Forest
© Breyden Anderson

About Irene J. O'Donnell

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